About

Starting CPR saves lives... so let’s be ready

Save a life Scotland

Every year over 3,500 people around Scotland are treated by the Ambulance Service after having a cardiac arrest.

Unfortunately only around 1 in 12 people will survive. Starting CPR saves lives… so let’s be ready. We’re asking you to say ‘I’ll do it’ and be one of 500,000 people in Scotland getting CPR ready.

We’re asking this as part of Scotland’s strategy for out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) launched in 2015 which aims to double survival rates across the country within five years. Reaching this level of performance would mean around 300 more lives being saved every year compared to recent years. This improvement programme could result in a total of 1,000 additional lives saved by 2020.

To achieve this bystander CPR is critical and so we aim to equip an additional 500,000 people with CPR skills by 2020. Increasing the incidence of bystander CPR is the cornerstone of improving outcomes because prompt bystander CPR can increase the likelihood of survival after OHCA by 2 or 3 times.

Facebook

2 days ago

We hope you've enjoyed our #DebunkFridays series! We're ending the series with a classic moment from #theoffice where the team learns #CPR with a focus on incorrect hand placement during chest compressions. It’s the opposite of a proper CPR learning session but it is very amusing nonetheless. Full clip: buff.ly/2zeVV2I

In this scene (see gif in comment section below), Michael is incorrectly performing CPR in the neck area. For proper chest compressions, the heel of one hand should be placed in the centre of the chest with the other hand on top. Interlock your fingers. Press down 5-6 cm at a rate of 100-120 compressions/min.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

5 days ago

Fantastic news! Amazing work by all involved ❤️ ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 week ago

Welcome back to #DebunkFridays! A series where we examine representations of #CPR and #cardiacarrest in TV/film. Today we’ll be looking at #Arrow and the incorrect placement of defibrillator pads on Oliver Green.

Check out the clip in the comments section below.

In this scene, you can see one of the pads is incorrectly placed on Oliver's stomach area. Check out the graphic for the correct placement of defibrillator pads. Did you know that PADs (Public Access Defibrillators) also known as AEDs (Automated External Defibrillators) will have visual instructions to guide you on pad placement should you ever need to use one.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Find us on Facebook